A Simple Calendar for Mars

Jeremiahn is a simple calendar for Mars. This is a Christian calendar for Mars. It is the only Christian calendar for Mars, so far. This calendar also has variants to be used on every other planet and a few dwarfs. With the Gas Giant variants they are mostly for used on their moons. Each of my variants also has Christian aspects.

December 14, 2014

pdfs

Jeremiahn Calendars and Reference to Jeremiahn Calendars
These are just two documents that look better and better explain the following calendars!! All of these calendars are my own creation!! This has been updated last 11/2/12 @ 6:00 a.m.

February 18, 2012

A Historical log of Other Planetary Facts

c. Haumea: 6,452,000,000 km (43.36 AU) 0 Jeremiahn Variants
Distance from the Sun
Mean distance 6,452,000,000 km (43.36 AU)
Period of Revolution around the Sun 285 E-y
Mean radius 718 km
Orbital eccentricity 0.189
Orbital inclination 28.19°
Mass (4.006 ± 0.040)×1021 kg
d. Makemake: 6.850 Tm (45.79 AU) 0 Jeremiahn Variants




Distance from the Sun
Mean distance 45.791 AU (6.850 Tm)
Period of revolution around the Sun 310 E-y
Mean radius 710 ± 30 km
Orbital eccentricity 0.159
Orbital inclination 28.96°
Mass 3 × 1021 kg
e. Eris: 10,120,000,000 km (67.670 AU) 0 Jeremiahn Variants
Distance from the Sun
Mean distance 10,120,000,000 km (67.670 AU)
Period of revolution around Sun 560 E-y
Mean radius 1488.325 km
Orbital eccentricity 0.44177
Orbital inclination 44.177°
Natural satellites 1




Eris is the largest dwarf planet[1]. Discovered in 2003 by astronomers at the California Institute of Technology, it is the most distant object ever seen in orbit around the Sun. Little is known about Eris.
Eris has a highly elliptical orbit and takes 560 E-y to go around the Sun—more than twice the time it takes Pluto. Its inclination is steep, tilted at 44° to the planetary plane. It also has an extremely eccentric orbit. It will be at its closest, actually coming inside par of Pluto’s orbit, in about 280 E-y.
As of yet, nothing is known about Eris’s atmosphere, however, it may be similar to Pluto’s.
Eris, with a surface covered in frozen methane, may be similar to Pluto and the Neptunian moon Triton. Observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope show Eris’s surface is almost white and uniform, reflecting 86 percent of the light that hits it. This makes it the most reflective body in the Solar System. The dwarf planet’s interior is likely a mixture of rock and ice.
Eris has one moon. It is officially called S/2005 (2003 UB313) 1. Unofficially, it is referred to as Gabrielle. Little is known about this object.
These are some comparison pictures.
This is so you can keep everything in perspective.



























A Historical log of the Sun

The Sun:



A handle-shaped cloud of plasma erupts from the Sun.
Our solar system’s star, the Sun, has inspired mythological stories in cultures around the world, including those of the ancient Egyptians, the Aztecs of Mexico, Native American tribes of North America, the Chinese, and many others. A number of ancient cultures built stone structures or modified natural rock formations to observe the Sun and Moon, they charted the seasons, created calendars, and monitored solar and lunar eclipses. These architectural sites show evidence of deliberate alignments to astronomical phenomena: sunrises, moonrises, moonsets, even stars or planets[1].
The Sun is the closest star to Earth, at a mean distance from our planet of 149.60 million kilometers. This distance is known as an astronomical unit (abbreviated AU), and sets the scale for measuring distances all across the solar system. The Sun is a huge sphere of mostly ionized gas that does supports life on Earth. It powers photosynthesis in green plants, and is ultimately the source of all food and fossil fuel. The connection and interactions between the Sun and Earth drive the seasons, ocean currents, weather, and climate.
The Sun is 332,900 times more massive than Earth and contains 99.86 percent of the mass of the entire solar system. It is held together by gravitational attraction, producing immense pressure and temperature at its core. The Sun has six regions - the core, the radiative zone, and the convective zone in the interior; the visible surface, known as the photosphere; the chromosphere; and the outermost region, the corona.



The faint, tenuous solar corona can’t be easily seen from Earth.
At the core, the temperature is about 15 million degrees Celsius, which is sufficient to sustain thermonuclear fusion. The energy produced in the core powers the Sun and produces essentially all the heat and light we receive on Earth. Energy from the core bounces around the radiative zone, taking about 170,000 Earth years to get to the convective zone. The temperature drops below two million degrees Celsius in the convective zone, where large bubbles of hot plasma (a soup of ionized atoms) move upwards.
The Sun’s “surface” - the photosphere - is a 500-kilometer-thick region, from which most of the Sun’s radiation escapes outward and is detected as the sunlight we observe here on Earth about eight minutes after it leaves the Sun. Sunspots in the photosphere are areas with strong magnetic fields that are cooler, and thus darker, than the surrounding region. The temperature of the photosphere is about 5,500 degrees Celsius. Above the photosphere lie the tenuous chromosphere and the corona. Visible light from these top regions is usually too weak to be seen against the brighter photosphere, but during total solar eclipses, when the Moon covers the photosphere, the chromosphere can be seen as a red rim around the Sun and the corona forms a beautiful white halo.
Above the photosphere, the temperature increases with altitude, reaching temperatures as high as two million degrees Celsius. The source of coronal heating has been a scientific mystery for more than 50 Earth years. Likely solutions have emerged from observations by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) missions, which found patches of magnetic field covering the entire solar surface. Scientists now think that this magnetic “carpet” is probably a source of the corona’s intense heat. The corona cools rapidly, losing heat as radiation and in the form of the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that flows to the edge of the solar system.
Sun: Facts & Figures
Discovered By
Known by the Ancients
Date of Discovery
Unknown
Equatorial Radius
695,500 km
By Comparison: 109 x that of Earth
Equatorial Circumference
4,379,000 km
By Comparison: 109 x that of Earth
Volume
1,412,200,000,000,000,000 km3
By Comparison: 1,300,000 Earths
Mass
1,989,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 t
By Comparison: 332,900 x Earth’s
Density
1.409 g/cm3
By Comparison: 0.255 that of Earth
Surface Area
6,087,799,000,000 km2
By Comparison: 11,990 Earths
Equatorial Surface Gravity
274.0 m/s2
By Comparison: 28 x Earth’s surface gravity
Escape Velocity
2,223,720 km/h
By Comparison: 55 x Earth
Sidereal Day
25.38 Earth days
609.12 hours
Minimum/Maximum Surface Temperature
5,500 °C
Effective Temperature
5504 °C
Additional Information:
Spectral Type: G2 V Luminosity: 3.83 x 10 33 ergs/sec.
Age: 4.6 Billion E-y
Composition: 92.1% Hydrogen, 7.8% Helium
Synodic Period: 27.2753 E-d
Rotation Period at Equator: 26.8 E-d
Rotation Period at Poles: 36 E-d
Velocity Relative to Near Stars: 19.7 km/s
Mean Distance to Earth: 149.60 million km (1.000 AU)
Solar Constant (Total Solar Irradiance): 1.365 - 1.369 kW/m2
(at the mean distance of the Earth from the Sun, about 1.000 AU)
Why explore, because the Sun is our nearest star. Solar activity affects us on Earth (electronics and communications on the ground and satellites in orbit can be affected by solar storms). Solar activity also affects human and robotic explorers traveling through our solar system. The Sun is the source of most of the light and heat in our solar system.




[1] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 19 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Sun&Display=Overview>

A Historical log of a Calendar for Earth

3. Earth: 149,597,890 km (1.000 AU) 1 Gregorian
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 147,100,000 km
Aphelion 152,100,000 km
Mean distance 149,597,890 km (1.000 AU)
Year length 365.2425 E-d
Orbital eccentricity 0.0167
Orbital inclination 0.0°
Solar day 24 h
Sidereal day 23 h 56' 4.2"
Rotational inclination 23.45°
Mass 5,973,700,000,000,000,000,000 t
Mean radius 6,378.14 km
Mean density 5.515 g/cm3
Moons 1
Average surface temperature 15 °C
February 24, +1582 E Past
October 15, +1582 E Past


This is the Gregorian Calendar for Earth. This is the internationally accepted civil calendar for Earth. We have been using it since 1582[1]. A “day” is one rotation of Earth. A day is 24 h long; its year is 365.2425 E-d long. The clock counts 24 h before ticking to the next day. We use an A.M. and P.M. system. A.M. is ante meridian and P.M. is post meridian. A.M. is morning time and P.M. is evening time. The “day” is the base unit. The hour, minute, and second are used widely. The year is divided into 12 months spanning 28-31 E-d each. It has a 365 common year and a 366 leap year. This gives us what we understand[2]. I will give the origin of the month names after the table[3]. This calendar starts its year count with one[4]. This is a great calendar and does not need to be changed. Earth is 149,592,890 km (1.000 AU) from the Sun, giving us the year we know.
Earth is the fifth-largest planet and the third from the Sun. Its mass is 5,973,700,000,000,000,000,000 t. Earth’s equatorial diameter is 2303 km while its polar diameter is only 12711.1 km.
Earth is considered a solid mass, yet it has a large, liquid iron, magnetic core with a radius of 3475.44 km. Surprisingly, it has a solid inner core that may be a large iron crystal, with a radius of 1222.84 km. Around the core is a thick shell, or mantle, of dense rock. This mantle is composed of materials rich in iron and magnesium. It is somewhat plastic-like, and under slow steady pressure, it can flow like a liquid. The mantle, in turn, is covered by a thin crust forming the solid granite and basalt base of the continents and ocean basins. Over broad areas of Earth’s surface, the crust has a thin cover of sedimentary rock such as sandstone, shale, and limestone formed by weathering and by deposits of sands, clays, and plant and animal remains.
#. Month Spans
1. January 31
2. February 28-29
3. March 31
4. April 30
5. May 31
6. June 30
7. July 31
8. August 31
9. September 30
10. October 31
11. November 30
12. December 31
January was named after Janus, protector of the gateway to heaven.
February was named Februalia, a time period when sacrifices were made to atone for sins.
March was named for Mars, the god of war, signifying that fighting interrupted by the winter could be resumed.
April is from aperire, Latin for “to open” (buds).
May was named after Maia, the goddess of growth of plants.
June is from Junius, Latin for the goddess Juno
July was named after Julius Caesar.
August was named after Augustus, the first Roman Emperor
September is from septem, Latin for seven.
October is from octo, Latin for eight.
November is from novem, Latin for nine.
December is from decem, Latin for ten.
Earth, our home planet, is the only planet in our solar system known to harbor life - life that is incredibly diverse. All of the things we need to survive are provided under a thin layer of atmosphere that separates us from the uninhabitable void of space. Earth is made up of complex, interactive systems that are often unpredictable. Air, water, land, and life - including humans - combine forces to create a constantly changing world that we are striving to understand.
Viewing Earth from the unique perspective of space provides the opportunity to see Earth as a whole. Scientists around the world have discovered many things about our planet by working together and sharing their findings.
Some facts are well known. For instance, Earth is the third planet from the Sun and the fifth largest in the solar system. Earth’s diameter is just a few hundred kilometers larger than that of Venus. The four seasons are a result of Earth’s axis of rotation being tilted more than 23 degrees.
The temperature inside this Earth increases about -17.22°C with every 30.48 to 60.96 m in depth, in the upper 100 km of Earth, and reaches nearly 4426.67 to 4982.22°C at the center. The heat is believed to come from radioactivity in the rocks, pressures within Earth, and the original heat of formation.
Earth’s atmosphere is a blanket composed of 78 percent nitrogen, 21 percent oxygen, and one percent argon. Present in minute quantities are carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, helium, krypton, and xenon. Water vapor displaces other gases and varies from nearly zero to about four percent by volume. The atmosphere rests on Earth’s surface with a weight equivalent to a layer of water 10.36 m deep. For about 91440 m upward, the gases remain in the proportions stated. Gravity holds the gases to Earth. The weight of the air compresses it at the bottom so that the greatest density is at Earth’s surface. Pressure and density decreases as height increases.

This is a time zone map (above): 1.
Greenwich Mean Time is the universal time. Greenwich is a town in Britain on the Prime Meridian of Earth. Each time zone is near a 15° E/W line[5]. In-fact that is the waters and sky rule: add or subtract an hour for every 15° E/W line crossed depending on direction traveled. Sun dials to recognized time zones, but not daylight savings time (DST). When the time zones were first getting started there was 1,669.756 km between each of them; measuring clockwise from Earth’s Origin Point (0° E/W, 0° N/S). They were made into the shapes they are now because of man. On the map on the previous page 25.4 mm = 1,577.725 km. For lunar time zones should Earth get a lunar colony: 454.513 km between each measuring clockwise around from its Origin Point. The lunar colony would still use the Gregorian for day-to-day planning of activities. The leap year on Earth falls every four Earth years, omitted every 100 E-y, and added back every 400 E-y. The leap day is February 29. The Gregorian is currently the most accurate calendar on Earth; its Ls is the anti-meridian the 180° line. The 180° is also what International Date Line follows. To remember the lengths of the months: “30 E-d has September, April, June and November; all others have 31 E-d; except February which has 28-29 E-d.” The Earth has a seven-day week cycle on the calendar for religious purposes. This makes religion easy. This week cycle has not been interrupted for millennia on Earth even with the calendar changes. It dates back to Biblical times. It is what we understand. Some other week cycles have been tried, but all others have been rejected by the public. We should stick with the seven-day week cycle.
The seven days in our week are:
7 E-d Name Meanings
1 Sunday Sun’s day
2 Monday Moon’s day
3 Tuesday Mars’ day
4 Wednesday Mercury’s day
5 Thursday Jupiter’s day
6 Friday Venus’ day
7 Saturday Saturn’s day
The Gregorian has an epoch of Jesus Christ’s birth; which is December 25, +0 E. JD count for the Gregorian current calculation is from November 23, -4713; JDN = (1461*(Y+4800+(M− 14)/12))/4+(367*(M−2−12*((M−14)/12)))/12−(3*((Y+4900+(M−14)/12)/100))/4+D–32075; which is 1,721,419 on Gregorian Tuesday, December 25, +0 E. Example: 2,455,101 on Gregorian September 26, +2009 E; the decimal of a JD is unimportant just drop the decimal, it’s a quirk. Y = current Earth year, M = current Earth month, and D = current Earth day; get information from calendar. JD count does not change from calendar to calendar or from planet to planet, it is always the same no matter where you are in the Universe. Astronomical Year Numbering is when a year 0 is used: A.D. dates remain the same and B.C. dates are pushed back a year (1, 2, 3, and 4 … B.C. is 0, -1, -2, and -3 …). Without this a year 0 would appear on the Gregorian. A.D. is Anno Domini in the year of Christ our Lord and B.C. is before Christ. The current Earth year is +2009 E. This calendar begins with January 1. This is a vernal equinox calendar, it is non-perpetual. The seasons fall like this: March 21 is vernal equinox, June 21 is summer solstice, September 21 is autumnal equinox, and December 21 is winter solstice; sometimes jump back or forward a day. January 4 is perihelion and July 4 is aphelion. There are many holidays on Earth. All of which can be gotten by looking at a calendar: Christmas, Thanksgiving, and Halloween just name a few. The Gregorian is the current calendar and has been since 1582. There are very few inaccuracies with the Gregorian. The Gregorian does have a lunar section, contrary to popular belief. It is a lunar-solar calendar, not just solar. The ages are start school at five Earth years, drive at 16 E-y, vote at and end school at 18 E-y, legal to drink alcohol at 21 E-y, and retire at 65 E-y. The length of a workday is 8 h. This is what we know.
Rough drafts information:
We have been tracking our planets progress every since man first said, “ur the Sun rises and it sets.” Truly I do not know how cavemen would have seen that or described it, but that is where the measuring of Earth-time began.
Calendars in widespread use today include the Gregorian calendar, which is the de facto international standard, and is used almost everywhere in the world for civil purposes, including in the People’s Republic of China and India (along with the Indian national calendar). Due to the Gregorian calendar’s obvious connotations of Western Christianity, non-Christians and even some Christians sometimes justify its use by replacing the traditional era notations “AD” and “BC” (“Anno Domini” and “Before Christ”) with “CE” and “BCE” (“Common Era” and “Before Common Era”). [I don’t care how much this may offend others, but I will never stop using the traditional era notations. In my opinion those are the only correct era notations.] The Hindu calendars are some of the most ancient calendars of the world. Eastern Christians of Eastern Europe and western Asia used for a long time the Julian calendar, which of the old Orthodox Church, in countries likes Russia. For over 1500 years, Westerners used the Julian calendar also. While the Gregorian calendar is widely used in Israel’s business and day-to-day affairs, the Hebrew calendar, used by Jews worldwide for religious and cultural affairs, also influences civil matters in Israel (such as national holidays) and can be used there for business dealings (such as for the dating of checks).
The Iranian (Persian) calendar is used in Iran and Afghanistan. The Islamic calendar is used by most non-Iranian Muslims worldwide. The Chinese, Hebrew, Hindu, and Julian calendars are widely used for religious and/or social purposes. The Ethiopian calendar or Ethiopic calendar is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and Eritrea. In Thailand, where the Thai solar calendar is used, the months and days have adopted the western standard, although the years are still based on the traditional Buddhist calendar.
Even where there is a commonly used calendar such as the Gregorian calendar, alternate calendars may also be used, such as a fiscal calendar or the astronomical year numbering system.
Fiscal calendars:
A fiscal calendar (such as a 4/4/5 calendar) fixes each month at a specific number of weeks to facilitate comparisons from month to month and year to year. January always has exactly 4 weeks (Sunday through Saturday), February has 4 weeks, March has 5 weeks, etc. Note that this calendar will normally need to add a 53rd week to every 5th or 6th year, which might be added to December or might not be, depending on how the organization uses those dates. There exists an international standard way to do this (the ISO week). The ISO week starts on a Monday, and ends on a Sunday. Week 1 is always the week that contains 4 January in the Gregorian calendar.
Fiscal calendars are also used by businesses. This is where the fiscal year is just any set of 12 months. This set of 12 months can start and end at any point on the Gregorian calendar. This is the most common usage of fiscal calendars.
Applications information:
The applications for this calendar are used in everyday life. Some examples of this are in fiscal years and in schools’ academic years. Below is a table of Earth’s United States school system set up. I would like to suggest a millisecond counter for Earth’s clock.
You run into this calendar everywhere you go on Earth. It is Earth’s de facto civil calendar. So the uses are quite wide ranged. There really ain’t a better way to explain it. Earth’s color will be green for the purpose of interplanetary use. To be born anywhere in the universe whether orbiting a star or not Earth-time is the default for the human race. Although a JD count would not change no matter where you are in the universe it is hard to measure age with a JD count in my experience. The JD count would be used for interplanetary trade, commerce, and business. This will be to keep every on the same plane of time. So as to not be too confusing all JD counts will be shown along with the planet and Earth times for wherever the product is being shipped from.
Earth
ages grades
5 p
6 k
7 1
8 2
9 3
10 4
11 5
12 6
13 7
14 8
15 9
16 10
17 11
18 12
Human evolution does occur. We were created by God (Jehovah) whose son is Jesus Christ, in the beginning; in His image. After this occurred evolution started; so that the humans that are alive today are not the same humans that God created. This is what I believe. Scientists cannot find a “missing link” because there ain’t a “missing link!!” Humans did not evolve from apes, humans evolved from themselves (other humans). Below is a table of humanities evolution.
humanity scientific classification
Domain Eukarya
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Mammalia
Order Primates
Family Hominidae
Genus Sahelanthropus, Orrorin, Ardipithecus, Kenyanthropus, Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and Homo
Species spp.
Yes as you can see I do believe that humans are primates, but we did not evolve from any other kind of primate. We evolved from ourselves. There is no “missing link.” All species listed above are humans, period. Here is what scientists classified these species as:
S. tchadensis; O. tugenensis; Ar. ramidus; Ar. kadabba; K. platyops; Au. anamensis; Au. afarensis;
Au. bahrelghazali; Au. africanus; Au. garhi; P. aethiopicus; P. boisei; P. robustus; H. habilis;
H. rudolfensis; H. georgicus; H. ergaster; H. erectus, H. e. lantianensis, H. e. palaeojavanicus,
H. e. pekinensis, H. e. nankinensis, H. e. wushanensis, H. e. yuanmouensis, H. e. soloensis;
H. cepranensis; H. antecessor; H. heidelbergensis; H. neanderthalensis; H. rhodesiensis;
H. floresiensis; and H. sapiens, H. s. idaltu, H. s. sapiens
This is what modern man currently is: H. s. sapiens. This is what I believe we’re fated to evolve into next for Earth-bound humans only: H. superior, H. robustus. You do not have to agree with me; truly I do not care if you do. The H. superior may already exist; they are the people with special brain powers like: telekinesis, telepathy, precognitions, teleportation, etc. There are also the people with physical mutations, which act as benefits. The H. robustus does not exist yet because cyborgs, people with artificial computerized limbs/body-parts, have not started to be well born with them; that or humans haven’t gotten to the point where we are genetically engineering our offspring yet. One of those two things would have to occur in-order for H. robustus to exist. The life span of a human is: 120 E-y[6].
Earth
day 24 h
clock 12 h face
year 365.2425 E-d
common year 365 E-d
leap year 366 E-d
placement February 29
formula +4 E-y; -100 E-y, +400 E-y
distance 1 AU
moons 1
week 7 E-d
accuracy N/A
Universal time Greenwich Mean Time
covers check map page 19
epoch 12/25/+0000 E 1,721,419
seasons spring March 21
summer June 21
fall September 21
winter December 21
ages start school at 5 E-y
drive at 16 E-y
vote at 18 E-y
drink alcohol at 21 E-y
retire at 65 E-y
work 8 h
competitors yes and no few
independence yes
Here’s another calendar that I have been working on to track time on Earth. This particular calendar is based on the Zodiac System. I used this system just because it’s familiar and simple to understand. I think that this particular calendar would be a little more accurate than the Gregorian we have now. I call this calendar the Jeremiahn Earth Zodiac Calendar, Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Eight. The following table shows you how this calendar works.
sign range seasons
names symbol traditional sidereal drift trad sidereal drift
begin end begin end begin end
Aries  3/21 4/19 4/14 5/14 4/20 5/14 spring spring spring
Taurus  4/20 5/20 5/15 6/14 5/15 6/21 spring summer summer
Gemini  5/21 6/20 6/15 7/14 6/22 7/20 summer summer summer
Cancer  6/21 7/22 7/15 8/14 7/21 8/10 summer summer summer
Leo  7/23 8/22 8/15 9/13 8/11 9/16 summer fall fall
Virgo  8/23 9/22 9/14 10/14 9/17 10/31 fall fall fall
Libra  9/23 10/22 10/15 11/13 11/1 11/21 fall fall fall
Scorpio  10/23 11/21 11/14 12/14 11/22 12/8 fall winter winter
Sagittarius  11/22 12/21 12/15 1/13 12/9 1/20 winter winter winter
Capricorn  12/22 1/19 1/14 2/12 1/21 2/16 winter winter winter
Aquarius  1/20 2/19 2/13 3/14 2/17 3/12 winter spring spring
Pisces  2/20 3/20 3/15 4/13 3/13 4/19 spring spring spring
This next table shows you where the leap day falls and where the seasons fall.
sign leap year seasonal markers
names symbol trad sidereal drift traditional sidereal drift
Aries  vernal equinox
Taurus  Aries 1 Pisces 5 Pisces 3
Gemini 
Cancer  summer solstice
Leo  Cancer 1 Gemini 6 Taurus 38
Virgo 
Libra  Pisces 9 Aquarius 13 Aquarius 17 autumnal equinox
Scorpio  Libra 1 Virgo 5 Virgo 6
Sagittarius 
Capricorn  leap day winter solstice
Aquarius  leap day leap day Sagittarius 31 Sagittarius 5 Sagittarius 11
Pisces 
I have it setup so that the leap day falls on Pisces when the year is divisible by four unless it’s a centurial year. Leap centurial years only occur when the centurial year is divisible by 400. The leap days shown in the table above are trying to make them fall on the same day that our leap year falls on. This is how it works for the traditional system. The only difference in the drift system is that the leap day falls in Aquarius instead of Pisces. The reason I have it setup this way is so that the leap day lines up with the one on the Gregorian. The year numbering for this calendar is identical to that in the Gregorian calendar. This means that if the current year is 2011 then it is still numbered 2011 even on this system. As you can see this calendar begins with the vernal equinox, which means that the years don’t change with Gregorian, which is for the traditional calendar. The vernal equinox for the drift calendar is Pisces 3. The vernal equinox on the sidereal version of my calendar is Pisces 5. I think that this makes this calendar more accurate. I am not sure that my drift calculations will hold out over time, you may need to recalculate those every now and then. I think it is ok for now though. I ran some numbers for a sidereal version of this calendar as well.






[1] Day of Week Calculator. CalculatorCat.com Calculators. Web. 14 Sept. 2009. <http://www.calculatorcat.com/free_calculators/day_of_week.phtml>.
[2] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Venus. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 328.
[3] Rowen, Beth. Calendars. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2004. 49-53.
[4] Rowen, Beth. Space. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2006. 219.
[5] http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/.html. Fact Monster.© 2000–2007 Pearson Education, publishing as Fact Monster. 02 Oct. 2009 <http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0855474.html>.
[6] Genesis 6:3

February 14, 2012

A Calendar Variant for Ceres

a. Ceres: 413,832,587 km (2.766 AU) 1 Jeremiahn Variant
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 380,995,855 km (2.55 AU)
Mean distance 413,832,587 km (2.77 AU)
Period of revolution around Sun 4.6 E-y
Orbital eccentricity 0.0789
Orbital inclination 10.58°
Sidereal day 9.075 h
Mean radius 482.7 km




Ceres was the first asteroid ever discovered, on January 1, 1801, by Guiseppe Piazzi[1]. In the 1800s, it was considered a planet, but as more asteroids were discovered, it lost that designation. In August of 2006, it was designated a “dwarf planet” by the International Astronomical Union.
No probe has ever visited Ceres. NASA’s DAWN space probe, launched in September 2007, may become the first. The DAWN probe’s mission is to Vesta and Ceres, the Solar System’s two largest asteroids. When DAWN arrives at Ceres in February 2015, months before New Horizons probe arrives at Pluto, it will be the first mission to study a dwarf planet.
Ceres orbits the Sun in the asteroid belt region between Mars and Jupiter.
It is not known if Ceres has an atmosphere. However, it may be similar to the atmosphere on Mercury or the Earth’s Moon. It has a sidereal day length of 9.075 h[2].
Ceres is in a class of stony meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These are considered to be the oldest materials in the Solar System, with a composition reflecting that of the primitive solar nebula. Extremely dark in color, probably because of their hydrocarbon content, they show evidence of having absorbed water of hydration. Thus, unlike the Earth and the Moon, they have never either melted or been reheated since they first formed.
If a calendar was designed for Ceres it would have to be designed around the sidereal day, because the solar day has not been measured. I have estimated a solar day for Ceres to be 9.394 h. The calendar for convenience would have a trisol as its base unit. The trisol would be 28.18261 h long or 28 h 10' 57.4" long. I do think that this dwarf planet would be a perfect colonial candidate if we wanted to mine the Asteroid Belt. Its orbit is 4.6 E-y or 1,680.1155 E-d or 1,430.768346 C-ld. I will divide this calendar into 4 segments, w/ each segment being 357-358 C-ld long each. I would divide each segment into 12 months of about 30 C-ld long each. This is simple and easy to understand for everyone to grasp. This calendar does start with one on its year count. This calendar uses the English zodiac on its Zodiacal months. This is an easy calendar. This is simple and easy to understand. I find it quite easy to grasp. A common year on Ceres is 1,430 C-ld and a leap year 1,431 C-ld; a regular segment is 357 C-ld and a irregular segment is 358 C-ld. Ceres is 413,832,587 km (2.77 AU) from the Sun, which gives it a longer year.
The 4 Segments in my Cererian year are:
#. Segments Spans
Names Months C-ld
1. Alpha 12 357-358
2. Beta 12 358
3. Serpentarius 12 357
4. Omega 12 358
The 12 months in each segment of my Cererian year are:
#. Months Spans
1. January 30
2. February 29-30
3. March 30
4. April 30
5. May 29
6. June 30
7. July 30
8. August 30
9. September 29
10. October 30
11. November 30
12. December 30
Now I will calculate the calendar’s leap Cererian year. Its leap Cererian year will fall: every 2 C-y, omitted every 100 C-y. The leap trisol is February 30 in Alpha. This calendar has an accuracy of 4,677,789 C-y, its Ls is the anti-meridian. To remember the lengths of the months say: “30 C-ld has all months; May and September also have 29 C-ld, except February which has 30 C-ld in irregular segments only otherwise it has 29 C-ld.” Eventually if the colony ever got big enough we would need to develop Cererian time zones as well. I would do this similar to the Earth’s time zones; which is add or subtract an hour every 15° E/W of the Prime Meridian, respectively. The shape was produced by limb fitting from a subset of 217 images. The shape of Ceres was found to be an oblate spheroid. The planet centric coordinate is defined based on the pole orientation of Ceres, and the prime meridian is defined on a bright spot, Claudia, at about 10 deg north latitude[3]. I will leave the naming of these time zones up to someone else, as well as the official placement of them. When measuring from the Ceres’ Origin Point (0º E/W, 0º N/S) going clockwise there is 105.9 km between each time zone. The diameter of Ceres is about 950 km and it alone makes up one third of the asteroid belt's total mass[4]. Ceres has a circumference of 2,985 km. To our knowledge Ceres has no moons, but this same calendar would be used for any colony anywhere in the asteroid belt. This calendar does keep the religious seven-trisol week-cycle.
7 C-ld Name Meaning
1 Suntrisol Sunday
2 Vestatrisol Vesta’s day
3 Tuestrisol Tuesday
4 Wednestrisol Wednesday
5 Thurstrisol Thursday
6 Fritrisol Friday
7 Saturtrisol Saturday
This will make it more acceptable for the religious groups, making religion on Ceres and other places in the asteroid belt easy. Vesta is another asteroid in the asteroid belt, and the closet thing that Ceres has to a moon, so it gets a trisol in the week all to itself. On Ceres the GMT equivalent is Claudia Mean Time; this will establish other time zones. The epoch I will use is Jesus Christ’s birth. The JD count is 1,721,419. The epoch formula for Ceres is: ((y*365.2425*24)/ 28.18261)/ 1,430.768346; y = current Earth year, round to nearest whole number. This would make current Ceres year be +437 C. +437 C started on January 1, +2009 E and will end on July 6, +2013 E; July 7, +2013 E will start +438 C. This calendar begins with January 1. This is a Vernal Equinox calendar for Ceres, it is non-perpetual. The seasons will fall like this: March 21 in Alpha is Vernal Equinox, March 21 in Beta is Summer Solstice, March 21 in Serpentarius is Autumnal Equinox, and March 21 in Omega is Winter Solstice; all jump back a sol on leap Ceres years. July 7 in Alpha is aphelion and October 7 in Serpentarius is perihelion. I did not make any holitrisols for this planet. There are no inaccuracies in my calculations. This will be more accepted by religious groups. NASA has currently not decided on an independent calendar to use for timekeeping on Ceres. I am the only one to have created a calendar for Ceres. The age equivalencies are start school at one Ceres years, drive at three Ceres years, vote at and end school at four Ceres years, get drunk at five Ceres years, and retire at 14 C-y. The length of a worktrisol is 9 h 23' 39". This is simple. The name of my calendar for Ceres is Jeremiah Calendar Variant Ten.

[1] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Ceres. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 328.
[2] Janssen, Sarah. The World Almanac And Book Of Facts 2011. 2011. Castleton, NY: World Almanac Books, 2010. Print.
[3] Small bodies data ferret. HST Images, Albedo Maps, and Shape of 1 Ceres V1.0. 8-Feb-12. <http://sbn.psi.edu/ferret/datasetDetail.action;jsessionid=74CD7BEAAE1A2FDCCDDC27625D1FF052?dataSetId=EAR-A-HSTACS-5-CERESHST-V1.0>
[4] The Outer Planets, Dwarf planets. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Feb 2012. <http://lasp.colorado.edu/education/outerplanets/kbos_dwarfplanets.php>.

September 24, 2009

A Calendar Variant for Pluto

b. Pluto: 5,906,380,000 km (39.482 AU) 1 Jeremiahn Variants
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 4,436,820,000 km
Aphelion 7,375,930,000 km
Mean distance 5,906,380,000 km (39.482 AU)
Year length 247.68 E-y
Orbital eccentricity 0.2488
Orbital inclination 17.16°
Solar day 6 E-d 9 h 32' 2.992" (retrograde)
Sidereal day 6 E-d 9 h 18' (retrograde)
Rotational inclination 122.53°
Mass 13,000,000,000,000,000,000 t
Mean radius 1,151 km
Mean density 2 g/cm3
Moons 3
Average surface temperature -222.78 °C
October 21, +2009 E 12:05 PM
October 4, +2009 E 6:25 PM
June A 21, +8:01 P 11h50'35.716"
June A 4, +8:01 P 18h03'02.712"
A Calendar Variant for Pluto



Pluto is the furthest (dwarf) planet from the sun[1]. It is in the Kuiper Belt, a belt of comets beyond to orbit of Neptune. Pluto sometimes at a particular point in its orbit will come in-front of Neptune. Because of its distance from the Sun Pluto is very cold. In-fact the Sun is hard to tell from the other stars in Pluto’s night sky, unless you know what you are looking for. But Pluto would still be a good vacation spot. Though it might not be a good place for a colony, that does not mean we should not put one there. Pluto has a retrograde rotation. A Pluto year is 247.68 E-y and a Pluto-sol is 6.39726 E-d. Pluto has an average surface -222.778°C. Pluto has three moons: Charon, Nix, and Hydra. Pluto has thin nitrogen atmosphere, there is ice on it too. Terraforming would difficult for Pluto, but not impossible. Pluto is a great vacation spot. I would argue that because of Pluto and Charon’s unique relationship they are a “double-planet.”
I am doing this for fun. This is my Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Seven for Pluto. This is just a calendar made for pure fun. A Pluto-sol is 6.39726 E-d (6 E-d 9 h 32' 2.992"), so I will divide the Pluto-sol six ways for convenience: giving us a hexethsol. A hexethsol is 25.589 h (25 h 35' 20.544"). The “hexethsol” is the base unit[2]. This is 1 h 35' 20.544" longer than a day. Now I will take the Pluto year, 247.68 E-y, and put it into sols and divide it by 33 you get 2,667.964 M-d or 2,741.311 E-d. You take that number put it in hours and divide it by the hexethsol you get 2,571.084 P-xd (2,571 P-xd 2 h 8' 40.429"). The Pluto year is divided into 33 segments of this length. The Pluto year and segment are written together like this {P-y:segment}, do this for calendar year and measuring other things such as people’s age. The clock for this calendar uses our hours, minutes, and seconds. We will count 25 h 35' 20.544" before ticking to the next hexethsol. This clock does use a millisecond counter[3]. Each segment has 72 months; span 35-36 P-xd each. This calendar does start with one on its Pluto year count. A 2,571 P-xd regular segment and a 2,572 P-xd irregular segment[4]. A common Pluto year has 33 regular segments and a leap Pluto year has 32 regular segments and one irregular segment. Pluto is 5,906,380,000 km (39.482 AU) from the Sun, which gives it a longer year.
Pluto, named for the Roman god of the underworld, is the second largest known KBO (Kuiper Belt Object) in the Solar System. It was first discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh, and was classified as a planet until 2006 when the International Astronomical Union changed its designation to dwarf planet. The New Horizons spacecraft was launched on a voyage to Pluto and beyond in 2006; the spacecraft will make its closest approach to Pluto in July of 2015.
Because no probes have visited Pluto, it is difficult for astronomers to accurately take readings of the planet’s atmospheric composition. It is believed that an atmosphere of methane, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide exists when the planet is closer to the Sun. When Pluto is farther away from the Sun during its orbit, the atmosphere freezes and becomes part of its surface. Large regions on Pluto are dark, others light; Pluto has spots and perhaps polar caps. There is also evidence of temperature fluctuations on the planet that may indicate primitive weather. Its core may be rocky with a mantle of water ice surrounding it.
The 33 Segments in my Pluto year are:
#. segments spans #. segments spans
name months P-xd name months P-xd
1. Alpha 72 2571-2572 18. Antlia 72 2571
2. Beta 72 2571 19. Aquila 72 2571
3. Draco 72 2571 20. Grus 72 2571
4. Lynx 72 2571 21. Lyra 72 2571
5. Hercules 72 2571 22. Norma 72 2571
6. Serpentarius 72 2571 23. Microscopium 72 2571
7. Phoenix 72 2571 24. Monoceros 72 2571
8. Pegasus 72 2571 25. Musca 72 2571
9. Perseus 72 2571 26. Orion 72 2571
10. Lepus 72 2571 27. Sextans 72 2571
11. Octans 72 2571 28. Volans 72 2571
12. Crater 72 2571 29. Serpens 72 2571
13. Hydrus 72 2571 30. Scutum 72 2571
14. Fornax 72 2571 31. Pyxis 72 2571
15. Cygnus 72 2571 32. Sagitta 72 2571
16. Eridanus 72 2571 33. Omega 72 2571
17. Andromeda 72 2571
Pluto has three natural satellites. Charon, the biggest, has a diameter 1185.83 km—about half of Pluto’s diameter of 2389.37 km. No other planet of any kind has a moon so close to its size. Discovered in 1978, Charon orbits Pluto at a distance of 19629.8 km and takes 6.39 E-d to move around the planet. In the same length of time, Pluto and Charon both rotate once around their axes, meaning that a person standing on Pluto would always see the same face of Charon in the same part of the sky, every day and night. The Pluto-Charon system thus appears to rotate as virtually a rigid body. Both worlds are roughly spherical and comparable densities. Because of these similarities and their peculiar relationship, there is a debate as to whether Charon should one day be designated a dwarf planet.
The two other moons were discovered in 2005 and in 2006 were officially named Nix and Hydra.
The 72 months in each Segment in my Plutonian year are:
#. months spans #. months spans #. months spans
1. January A 35 25. January B 36 49. January C 36
2. Terra A 35 26. Terra B 36 50. Terra C 36
3. Pisces A 35 27. Pisces B 36 51. Pisces C 36
4. February A 35-36 28. February B 36 52. February C 36
5. Aries A 35 29. Aries B 36 53. Aries C 36
6. April A 35 30. April B 36 54. April C 36
7. Taurus A 35 31. Taurus B 36 55. Taurus C 36
8. Gemini A 35 32. Gemini B 36 56. Gemini C 36
9. May A 35 33. May B 36 57. May C 36
10. June A 35 34. June B 36 58. June C 36
11. Cancer A 35 35. Cancer B 36 59. Cancer C 36
12. July A 35 36. July B 36 60. July C 36
13. Leo A 35 37. Leo B 36 61. Leo C 36
14. Virgo A 35 38. Virgo B 36 62. Virgo C 36
15. Libra A 35 39. Libra B 36 63. Libra C 36
16. August A 35 40. August B 36 64. August C 36
17. Scorpio A 35 41. Scorpio B 36 65. Scorpio C 36
18. September A 35 42. September B 36 66. September C 36
19. Sagittarius A 35 43. Sagittarius B 36 67. Sagittarius C 36
20. October A 35 44. October B 36 68. October C 36
21. Capricorn A 35 45. Capricorn B 36 69. Capricorn C 36
22. November A 36 46. November B 36 70. November C 36
23. Aquarius A 36 47. Aquarius B 36 71. Aquarius C 36
24. December A 36 48. December B 36 72. December C 36
Now I will calculate the calendar’s leap Pluto year[5]. Its leap Pluto year will fall: every two Pluto years, omitted every 100 P-y, centurial one every 200 P-y. The leap bisol is February A 36 in Alpha. This calendar has an accuracy of 4,677,789 P-y, its Ls is the anti-meridian. To remember the lengths of the months say: “January A through Pisces A have 35 P-xd, February A has 35-36 P-xd, Aries A through Capricorn A have 35 P-xd, and all the rest have 36 P-xd,” and to remember the order refer back to my Jeremiahn Calendar for Mars and add a B and a C section. Eventually if the colony ever got big enough we would need to develop Plutonian time zones as well. I would do this similar to the Earth’s time zones; which is add or subtract an hour every 15° E/W of the Prime Meridian, respectively. Pluto and its moons already have Equators and Prime Meridians. Someone else will name these time zones[6]. On Pluto the GMT equivalent is Cero Mean Time. Cero refers to being 0º E/W of Pluto’s Prime Meridian. When measuring from the Pluto’s Origin Point (0º E/W, 0º N/S) going clockwise there is 293.345 km between each time zone. Any lunar colonies will use this same calendar, but I will try to develop time zones for the Pluto moons. So someone else will set up the Plutonian lunar time zones, but the Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Seven will be used on these Plutonian lunar colonies. Charon time zones will go like this 148.062 km between each when measuring clockwise from its Origin Point. Nix and Hydra have an average circumference of 172.788 km, so time zones are 6.752 km apart measuring clockwise from their Origin Points. This calendar is to have a seven-hexethsol week-cycle, so that it is liked by the religious groups. This is acceptable to religious group, making religion on Pluto easy.
The seven hexethsols in my Plutonian week are:
7 P-xd name meaning
1 Sunhexethsol Sunday (weekend)
2 Mondehexethsol Charon’s +Hydra’s + Nix’s day
3 Tueshexethsol Tuesday
4 Wedneshexethsol Wednesday
5 Thurshexethsol Thursday
6 Frihexethsol Friday
7 Saturhexethsol Saturday (weekend).
This calendar’s epoch is Jesus Christ’s birth. The JD count is 1,721,419[7]. The epoch formula for Pluto is: ((y*365.2425*24)/25.589)/84845.766; y = current Earth year, round to nearest whole number. This would make the current Pluto year be +8:01 P or +8 in Alpha P. +8:01 P or +8 in Alpha P started on January 1, +2009 E and will end on July 3, +2016 E; July 4, +2016 E will start +8:02 P or +8 in Beta P. This calendar begins on January A 1 in each segment. The Pluto year starts with January A 1 in Alpha. This is a non-perpetual calendar for Pluto. Pluto has no seasons therefore there is no need to track them[8]. The holibisols are as follows: April A 22 in Beta is Pluto Hexethsol, December A 10 in Beta is Exploration Hexethsol, and Foundation Hexethsol is the Hexethsol that the first colony was established on Pluto. NASA currently does not use an independent calendar for timekeeping on Pluto[9]. The age equivalencies are start school at zero segments and 45 months, drive at two segments and nine months, vote at and end school at two segments and 29 months, get drunk at two segments and 57 months, and retire at eight segments and 48 months. The length of a workhexethsol is 8 h 31' 46.8". This is simple.
Posted by J.S. at 9:44 AM 0 comments
Applications information:
There are none this calendar is just for fun!!!! Pluto’s color is dark yellow. The life span of a human is: 15 segments and 71 months. Our fix year is 8:03 P, so 8:04 P will start on May 17, 2011 E, and will end on November 18, 2018 E.
Pluto
sol 6.39726 E-d
1/6 sols
hexethsols 25 h 35' 20.544"
clock 12 h 47' 40.272" face
year 247.68 E-y
33 segments 1 segment = 2667.964 M-d
2741.311 E-d
2571.084 P-xd
72 months
regular = 2571 P-xd
irregular = 2572 P-xd
common year 33 regular segments
leap year 32 regular segments, 1 irregular segment
placement February A 36 in Alpha
formula +2 P-y; -100 P-y, +200 P-y
distance 39.482 AU
moons 3
week 7 P-xd
accuracy 4,677,789 P-y
GMT Cero Mean Time
covers 293.345 km each
epoch 12/25/+0000 E 1,721,419
+8:01 P start January 1, +2009 E
end July 3, +2016 E
seasons N/A
to our knowledge
ages start school at 0 segments and 45 months
drive at 2 segments and 9 months
vote at 2 segments and 29 months
drink alcohol at 2 segments and 57 months
retire at 8 segments and 48 months
work 8 h 31' 46.8"
competitors N/A
independence no

[1] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Pluto. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 329-330.[2] Scientific Astronomer Documentation. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Wolfram Research, Inc. 4 April 2009 <http://documents.wolfram.com/applications/astronomer/AdditionalInformation/PlanetographicCoordinates.html>[3] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[4] wilderness.org. Nelson, Gaylord. October 1993. Google, Inc. 13 April 2009 <http://earthday.wilderness.org/history/>
[5] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Pluto>
[6] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[7] Dictionary.com. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Ask.com. 2 April 2009 <http://dictionary.reference.com/translate>, Alphabetical listing of constellations. Dolan, Chris. 1 January 2005. Google, Inc. 11 May 2009 <http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellation_list.html>
[8] Rowen, Beth. Space. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2006. 220.
[9] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Plu_Charon&CFID=40948864&CFTOKEN=266b941844bf3604-ECB145CE-A09E-C8D5-0AC17333E8C6D527

September 08, 2009

A Calendar Variant for Neptune

8. Neptune: 4,498,252,900 km (30.069 AU) 1 Jeremiahn Variants
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 4,459,630,000 km
Aphelion 4,536,870,000 km
Mean distance 4,498,252,900 km (30.069 AU)
Year length 164.79 E-y
Orbital eccentricity 0.0113
Orbital inclination 1.769°
Solar day 16 h 6' 37"
Sidereal day 16 h 6' 36"
Rotational inclination 28.32°
Mass 102,440,000,000,000,000,000,000 t
Mean radius 24,764 km
Mean density 1.76 g/cm3
Moons 13
Average surface temperature* -201.11 °C
* i.e., temperature where atmosphere pressure equals one Earth atmosphere.
October 21, +2009 E 12:02 PM
September 29, +2009 E 3:00 PM
June A 21, +12:01 N 00h22'09.859"
June A 1, +12:01 N 14h50'21.637"
A Calendar Variant for Neptune

This is Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Six for Neptune[1]. I see no reasons why each moon of Neptune should have its own calendar. It seems much more reasonable to design the calendar for Neptune not its moons[2]. If we had a colony on Earth’s moon you would use the Gregorian or Earth calendar for daily planning, not a calendar based on the Moon like the Chinese. They are some very surprising facts about Neptune when trying to make a calendar for its moons. NASA recognizes this as Neptune’s official rotation: 16.1103 h (16 h 6' 37"), so the length I will use is that times two: 32.2206 h (32 h 13' 14"). This is a “bisol.” The “bisol” is the base unit[3]. The bisol is 10 h 28' 45.84" longer than a day. Two is if you take the orbit of Neptune, 164.79 E-y, and put it in sols and divide that by 33 you get 1775.09 M-d or 1823.89 E-d. You take that number and put it in hours and divide that by the bisol you get 1358.55 N-ld (1358 N-ld 17 h 43' 16.788"). The Neptune year is divided into 33 segments of this length. The Neptune year and segment are written together like this {N-y:segment}, do this for calendar year and measuring other things such as people’s age[4]. The clock for this calendar uses our hours, minutes, and seconds. We will count 32 h 13' 14" before ticking to the next bisol. This clock does use a millisecond counter. It is good to preserve our hours, minutes, and seconds; because not doing so would make measuring time way too confusing. Each segment has 48 months; span 28-29 N-ld each. This calendar does start with one on its Neptune year count. A 1358 N-ld regular segment and a 1359 N-ld irregular segment. A common Neptune year has 33 regular segments and a leap Neptune year has 32 regular segments and one irregular segment. Neptune is 4,498,252,900 km (30.069 AU) from the Sun, which gives it a longer year.
Named for the Roman god of the sea, Neptune was the first planet discovered through mathematical calculations and not observation. Its approximate orbit and position was first calculated independently by John Couch Adams and Urbain Le Verrier in 1845. In 1846, Johann Galle first observed Neptune through a telescope.
The Neptunian atmosphere is composed primarily of 80 percent hydrogen, 19 percent helium, and small amounts of hydrogen deuteride, ethane, ammonia ice, water ice, ammonia hydrosulfide, and methane ice. Neptune’s atmosphere is quite blue, with quickly changing white clouds often suspended high above an apparent surface. A Great Dark Spot was discovered in 1989 when Voyager 2 visited the planet, reminiscent of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope have shown the Great Dark Spot originally seen by Voyager has apparently dissipated, but a new dark spot has since appeared. Lightning and auroras have been found on other giant planets, but only the auroras of have been seen on Neptune. As with the other giant planets, Neptune is emitting more energy than it receives from the Sun. The excess has been found to be 2.7 times the solar contribution.
As with other giant planets, Neptune may have no solid surface, or exact diameter. However, a mean value of 49,235.4 km may be assigned to a diameter between levels where the pressure is the same as sea level on Earth.
The 33 Segments in my Neptune year are:
#. segments spans #. segments spans
name months N-ld name months N-ld
1. Alpha 48 1358-1359 18. Antlia 48 1358
2. Beta 48 1358 19. Aquila 48 1358
3. Draco 48 1358 20. Grus 48 1358
4. Lynx 48 1358 21. Lyra 48 1358
5. Hercules 48 1358 22. Norma 48 1358
6. Serpentarius 48 1358 23. Microscopium 48 1358
7. Phoenix 48 1358 24. Monoceros 48 1358
8. Pegasus 48 1358 25. Musca 48 1358
9. Perseus 48 1358 26. Orion 48 1358
10. Lepus 48 1358 27. Sextans 48 1358
11. Octans 48 1358 28. Volans 48 1358
12. Crater 48 1358 29. Serpens 48 1358
13. Hydrus 48 1358 30. Scutum 48 1358
14. Fornax 48 1358 31. Pyxis 48 1358
15. Cygnus 48 1358 32. Sagitta 48 1358
16. Eridanus 48 1358 33. Omega 48 1358
17. Andromeda 48 1358
Largest of Neptune’s 13 satellites is Triton. It is the only moon in a retrograde orbit, which suggests that it was captured rather than having been there from the beginning. Triton’s large size, sufficient to raise significant tides on the planet, may one day, billions of Earth years from now, cause Triton to come close enough to Neptune for it to be torn apart. Triton has a tenuous atmosphere of nitrogen with trace of hydrocarbons and evidence of active geysers injecting material into it. Triton is the coldest object yet measured in the Solar System with a surface temperature of –235°C.
The 48 months in each Segment in my Neptunian year are:
#. months spans #. months spans #. months spans
1. January A 28 17. Scorpio A 28 33. May B 28
2. Terra A 28 18. September A 28 34. June B 28
3. Pisces A 28 19. Sagittarius A 28 35. Cancer B 29
4. February A 28-29 20. October A 28 36. July B 29
5. Aries A 28 21. Capricorn A 28 37. Leo B 29
6. April A 28 22. November A 28 38. Virgo B 29
7. Taurus A 28 23. Aquarius A 28 39. Libra B 29
8. Gemini A 28 24. December A 28 40. August B 29
9. May A 28 25. January B 28 41. Scorpio B 29
10. June A 28 26. Terra B 28 42. September B 29
11. Cancer A 28 27. Pisces B 28 43. Sagittarius B 29
12. July A 28 28. February B 28 44. October B 29
13. Leo A 28 29. Aries B 28 45. Capricorn B 29
14. Virgo A 28 30. April B 28 46. November B 29
15. Libra A 28 31. Taurus B 28 47. Aquarius B 29
16. August A 28 32. Gemini B 28 48. December B 29
Now I will calculate the calendar’s leap Neptune year. Its leap Neptune year will fall: every six Neptune years, omitted every 100 N-y, centurial one every 600 N-y. The leap bisol is February A 29 in Alpha. This calendar has an accuracy of 4,677,789 N-y, its Ls is the anti-meridian. To remember the lengths of the months say: “January A through Pisces A has 28 N-ld; February A has 28-29 N-ld; Aries A through June B have 28 N-ld; and all the rest have 29 N-ld,” and to remember the order refer back to my Jeremiahn Calendar for Mars and add a B section. Eventually if the colony ever got big enough we would need to develop Neptunian time zones as well. I would do this similar to the Earth’s time zones; which is add or subtract an hour every 15° E/W of the Prime Meridian, respectively. Neptune and its moons already have Equators and Prime Meridians. Someone else will name these time zones. On Neptune the GMT equivalent is Nullity Mean Time[5]. Nullity refers to being 0º E/W of Neptune’s Prime Meridian. When measuring from the Neptune’s Origin Point (0º E/W, 0º N/S) going clockwise there is 4,829.12 km between each time zone. Since Neptune has no surface colonists would be required to live in flying cities. Any lunar colonies will use this same calendar, but I will try to develop time zones for the Neptunian moons. So someone else will set up the Neptunian lunar time zones, but the Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Six will be used on these Neptunian lunar colonies. When talking about lunar time zones, Neptune has several moons; so to establish the standard for the moons I will average the diameters. Their average diameter is 316.308 km, the time zones on the Neptunian moons will have 30.841 km between each time zone; going clockwise around them when measuring from their Origin Points. This calendar is to have a seven-bisol week-cycle, so that it is liked by the religious groups. This is acceptable to religious group, making religion on Neptune easy.
Only about half of Triton has been observed, but its terrain shows cratering and a strange regional feature described as resembling the skin of a cantaloupe. Nereid has the highest orbital eccentricity (0.75) of any moon.
The seven bisols in my Neptunian week are:
7 N-ld name meaning
1 Sunbisol Sunday (weekend)
2 Mondebisol Moons’ day
3 Tuesbisol Tuesday
4 Wednesbisol Wednesday
5 Thursbisol Thursday
6 Fribisol Friday
7 Saturbisol Saturday (weekend).
This calendar’s epoch is Jesus Christ’s birth. The JD count is 1,721,419. The epoch formula for Neptune is: ((y*365.2425*24)/32.2206)/44832.172; y = current Earth year, round to nearest whole number[6]. This would make the current Neptune year be +12:01 N or +12 in Alpha N. +12:01 N or +12 in Alpha N started on January 1, +2009 E and will end on August 8, +2010 E; August 9, +2010 E will start +12:02 N or +12 in Beta N. This calendar begins on January A 1 in each segment[7]. The Neptune year starts with January A 1 in Alpha. This is a non-perpetual calendar for Neptune; it is a Vernal Equinox Calendar. With this set up I can track the actual seasons on Neptune. The Neptune year is divided into four seasons[8]. The seasons fall: Vernal Equinox is February A 4 in Alpha, Summer Solstice is July A 8 in Perseus, Autumn Equinox is July A 8 in Andromeda, and Winter Solstice is July A 8 in Musca; all jump back a bisol on leap Neptune years. The holibisols are as follows: April A 22 in Beta is Neptune Bisol, December A 10 in Beta is Exploration Bisol, and Foundation Bisol is the bisol that the first colony was established on Neptune and/or its moons[9]. Each moon will have its own Foundation Bisol which will fall according to the definition. My reasoning for basing the calendar on Neptune and not each individual moon is as follows: they are moons of Neptune with locked orbits. None of these moons rotate, in that case and only that I would base the calendar on the moon not its primary. If we had a colony on Earth’s Moon the colonists would use the Earth calendar, Gregorian, not the Chinese for day to day activities and planning[10]. So this makes it logically to design a calendar for the Neptunian moons based on Neptune not each individual moon. NASA currently does not use an independent calendar for timekeeping on Neptune and/or its moons. The age equivalencies are start school at one segment, drive at three segments and 10 months, vote at and end school at three segments and 29 months, get drunk at four segments and 10 months, and retire at 13 segments and one month. The length of a workbisol is 10 h 44' 24.72". This is simple.
Posted by J.S. at 1:09 PM 0 comments
Applications information:
To talk evolution, I believe that people born on this planet could evolve into: Homo neptunus. Anyways people would set up everything to this calendar. The fiscal year would become just a cycle of any 33 calendar segments. When shipping between planets though everything would converted to the JD count or Earth-time. Now to talk the academic year, this would be quite different from Earth. So as to not get confused in the table below I will equate it to Earth-time for you. Our fix year is 12:05 N, so 12:06 N will start on January 1, 2011 E, and ends on November 11, 2015 E.
Triton is the largest moon of the planet Neptune, discovered on October 10, 1846 by William Lassell. It is the only large moon in the Solar System with a retrograde orbit, which is an orbit in the opposite direction to its planet’s rotation. At 2700 km in diameter, it is the seventh-largest moon in the Solar System. Triton comprises more than 99.5% of all the mass known to orbit Neptune, including the planet’s rings and twelve other known moons. Because of its retrograde orbit (unique in the Solar System for an object of its size) and composition similar to Pluto’s, Triton is thought to have been captured from the Kuiper belt.
Neptune Earth-time
grades ages grades ages grades
1 p 5 p
1&10 k 6 k
1&19 1 7 1
1&29 2 8 2
1&39 3 9 3
2 4 10 4
2&10 5 11 5
2&19 6 12 6
2&29 7 13 7
2&39 8 14 8
3 9 15 9
3&10 10 16 10
3&19 11 17 11
3&29 12 18 12
The importance of these applications is: because you were born on a different planet. If we were to measure you age in Earth-time we would not be getting an accurate image of how old you actually are. By setting everything to the new planet, Neptune, an accurate image of age and operations is given. The operations image explains why companies would set their fiscal year to the planet time, Neptune. Without it set to planet time, Neptune, and not Earth-time you would not get an accurate image of these company/business operations. As far as holidays/holibisols go there calendar would show both. The holidays on Neptune, most of them would be celebrated 33 times a year; the holibisols would be celebrated once per year. This would allow each holiday to occur once per segment.
The planet time is secondary. The planet time is tracked independently from Earth-time, but it is not shown apart from Earth-time. Therefore color codes are used: Neptune is turquoise, Earth is green. The life span of a human is: 24 segments and one month.
The way these calendars would be sold is near the end of each segment, because it is longer than an Earth year. The color coded remains the same for the clocks. All planet time clocks are digital, there is no “a.m./p.m.” style for Neptune. The clocks just count h ' ". Computers meant for Neptune would show time the same way. One Neptune-sol is shown as 16h06'37.000" and One Bisol is shown as 32h13'14.000". All Earth-time is shown in GMT. The Neptune time zones are arbitrary time zones; they are set up to the Neptunian coordinate system.
If someone was born on Neptune their birth certificate would read:
“Name: Terry Hue Greenstone ###-##-####
Place: New Joplin, United States Neptune Triton Colony #####
Room ### St. John’s Hospital #### Federal Street
When: June 6, +2026 E @ 2:56 p.m. or Capricorn B 9, +12:09 N @ 20h59'04.714"”
The birth certificate example above only includes what would be different between a regular Earth birth certificate and a birth certificate for someone born on this planet, Neptune. Next I will show you an example of what that same person’s divers license would look like, enlarged picture not included. All names in these examples are fake.
“NEW JOPLIN Under 21 E-y Until Class
DRIVER LICENSE 06-06-+2047 E (F)
45-09-+12:14 N
License Number N#########
GREENSTONE
TERRY HUE
#### GRAND ST
NEW JOPLIN, U.S. NEPTUNE TRITON #####
Birth-date Expiration Date
06-06-+2026 E 06-06-+2046 E
45-09-+12:09 N 45-09-+12:13 N
(sex) (height) (weight) (eye color)
Restrictions Endorsements
(signature)”
Neptune
sol 16 h 6' 37"
2 sols
bisols 32 h 13' 14"
clock 16 h 6' 37" face
year 164.79 E-y
33 segments 1 segment = 1775.09 M-d
1823.89 E-d
1358.55 N-ld
48 months
regular = 1358 N-ld
irregular = 1359 N-ld
common year 33 regular segments
leap year 32 regular segments, 1 irregular segment
placement February A 29 in Alpha
formula +6 N-y; -100 N-y, +600 N-y
distance 30.069 AU
moons 13
week 7 N-ld
accuracy 4,677,789 N-y
GMT Nullity Mean Time
covers 4829.12 km each
epoch 12/25/+0000 E 1,721,419
+12:01 N start January 1, +2009 E
end August 8, +2010 E
seasons spring Pisces A 20 in Alpha
summer Pisces B 29 in Pegasus
fall April A 20 in Cygnus
winter May A 29 in Norma
ages start school at 1 segment and 0 months
drive at 3 segments and 10 months
vote at 3 segments and 29 months
drink alcohol at 4 segments and 10 months
retire at 13 segments and 1 month
work 10 h 44' 24.72"
competitors N/A
independence no

[1] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Neptune. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 329-330.
[2] Scientific Astronomer Documentation. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Wolfram Research, Inc. 4 April 2009 <http://documents.wolfram.com/applications/astronomer/AdditionalInformation/PlanetographicCoordinates.html>

[3] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[4] wilderness.org. Nelson, Gaylord. October 1993. Google, Inc. 13 April 2009 <http://earthday.wilderness.org/history/>
[5] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Neptune&Display=Overview>
[6] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[7] Dictionary.com. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Ask.com. 2 April 2009 <http://dictionary.reference.com/translate>,Alphabetical listing of constellations. Dolan, Chris. 1 January 2005. Google, Inc. 11 May 2009 <http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellation_list.html>
[8] Rowen, Beth. Space. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2006. 220.
[9] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Neptune&Display=Moons>
[10] Greek Alphabet. Physics and Astronomy Links - PhysLink.com. Web. 09 Sept. 2009. <http://www.physlink.com/reference/GreekAlphabet.cfm>

September 02, 2009

A Calendar Variant for Uranus

7. Uranus: 2,870,972,200 km (19.191 AU) 1 Jeremiahn Variants
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 2,735,560,000 km
Aphelion 3,006,390,000 km
Mean distance 2,870,972,200 km (19.191 AU)
Year length 84.01 E-y
Orbital eccentricity 0.0457
Orbital inclination 0.772°
Solar day 17 h 14' 23" (retrograde)
Sidereal day 17 h 14' 24" (retrograde)
Rotational inclination 97.77°
Mass 86,849,000,000,000,000,000,000 t
Mean radius 25,559 km
Mean density 1.30 g/cm3
Moons 27
Average surface temperature* -197.22 °C
* i.e., temperature where atmosphere pressure equals one Earth atmosphere.
October 21, +2009 E 12:08 PM
October 1, +2009 E 1:46 PM
June 21, +23:01 U 00h07'48.127"
June 1, +23:01 U 13h25'34.143"
A Calendar Variant for Uranus

This is Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Five for Uranus[1]. I see no reasons why each moon of Uranus should have its own calendar. It seems much more reasonable to design the calendar for Uranus not its moons[2]. If we had a colony on Earth’s moon you would use the Gregorian or Earth calendar for daily planning, not a calendar based on the Moon like the Chinese. They are some very surprising facts about Uranus when trying to make a calendar for its moons. NASA recognizes this as Uranus’ official rotation: 17.2397 h (17 h 14' 23"), so the length I will use is that times two: 34.4794 h (34 h 28' 45.84"). Uranus rotation is retrograde, not that that is important to my calendar. This is a “bisol.” The “bisol” is the base unit[3]. The bisol is 10 h 28' 45.84" longer than a day. Two is if you take the orbit of Uranus, 84.019 E-y, but with how far away Uranus is I will make it have 31 segments of 936.427 M-d or 989.913 E-d. You take that number and put it in hours and divide that by the bisol you get 689.047 U-ld (689 U-ld 1 h 37' 13.915"). The Uranus year is divided into 31 segments of this length. The Uranus year and segment are written together like this {U-y:segment}, do this for calendar year and measuring other things such as people’s age[4]. The clock for this calendar uses our hours, minutes, and seconds. We will count 34 h 28' 45.84" before ticking to the next bisol. This clock does use a millisecond counter. It is good to preserve our hours, minutes, and seconds; because not doing so would make measuring time way too confusing. Each segment has 24 months; span 28-30 U-ld each. This calendar does start with one on its Uranus year count. A 689 U-ld regular segment and a 690 U-ld irregular segment. A common Uranus year has 31 regular segments and a leap Uranus year has 30 regular segments and one irregular segment. Uranus is 2,870,972,200 km (19.191 AU) from the Sun, which gives it a longer year.
Uranus, discovered by Sir William Herchel in 1781, was the first planet discovered using a telescope. It was named for the father of the Titans in Roman mythology.
The atmosphere is composed primarily of 82.5 percent hydrogen, 15.2 percent helium, 2.3 percent methane, with small amounts of hydrogen deutride, ammonia ice, water ice, ammonia hydrosulfide, and methane ice.
Uranus has no solid surface, and likely no rocky core but rather a mixture of rocks and assorted ices with about 15 percent hydrogen and some helium.
Uranus has 27 known moons, which have orbits lying in the plane of the planet’s equator. Five moons are relatively large, while 22 are very small and were only discovered with the Voyager 2 mission or in later observations. Miranda has grooved markings, reminiscent of Jupiter’s Ganymede, but often arranged in a chevron pattern. Rifts and channels on Ariel provide evidence of liquid flowing over its surface in the past. Umbriel is extremely dark, prompting some observers to regard its surface as among the oldest in the system. Titania has rifts fractures, but not the evidence of flow found on Ariel. Oberon’s main feature is its surface saturated with craters, unrelieved by other formations.
The 31 Segments in my Uranus year are:
#. segments spans #. segments spans
name months U-ld name months U-ld
1. Alpha 24 689-690 17. Andromeda 24 689
2. Beta 24 689 18. Antlia 24 689
3. Draco 24 689 19. Aquila 24 689
4. Lynx 24 689 20. Grus 24 689
5. Hercules 24 689 21. Lyra 24 689
6. Serpentarius 24 689 22. Norma 24 689
7. Phoenix 24 689 23. Microscopium 24 689
8. Pegasus 24 689 24. Monoceros 24 689
9. Perseus 24 689 25. Musca 24 689
10. Lepus 24 689 26. Orion 24 689
11. Octans 24 689 27. Sextans 24 689
12. Crater 24 689 28. Volans 24 689
13. Hydrus 24 689 29. Serpens 24 689
14. Fornax 24 689 30. Scutum 24 689
15. Cygnus 24 689 31. Omega 24 689
16. Eridanus 24 689
In the equatorial plane there is also a complex of 11 rings, nine of which were discovered in 1978 by observers watching Uranus pass before a star.
Once considered one of the blander-looking planets, Uranus (pronounced YOOR un nus) has been revealed as a dynamic world with some of the brightest clouds in the outer solar system and 11 rings. The first planet found with the aid of a telescope, Uranus was discovered in 1781 by astronomer William Herschel. The seventh planet from the Sun is so distant that it takes 84 E-y to complete one orbit. Uranus, with no solid surface, is one of the gas giant planets (the others are Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune).
The 24 months in each Segment in my Uranian year are:
#. months spans #. months spans
1. January 28 13. Leo 30
2. Terra 28 14. Virgo 30
3. Pisces 28 15. Libra 30
4. February 28-29 16. August 30
5. Aries 28 17. Scorpio 30
6. April 28 18. September 29
7. Taurus 28 19. Sagittarius 29
8. Gemini 28 20. October 29
9. May 28 21. Capricorn 29
10. June 28 22. November 29
11. Cancer 28 23. Aquarius 29
12. July 28 24. December 29
Now I will calculate the calendar’s leap Uranus year. Its leap Uranus year will fall: every three Uranus years, omitted every 100 U-y, centurial one every 300 U-y. The leap bisol is February 29 in Alpha. This calendar has an accuracy of 4,677,789 U-y, its Ls is the anti-meridian. To remember the lengths of the months say: “January through Pisces 28 U-ld; February has 28-29 U-ld; Aries through July all have 28 U-ld; Leo through Scorpio have 30 U-ld; and all the rest have 29 U-ld,” and to remember the order refer back to my Jeremiahn Calendar for Mars. Eventually if the colony ever got big enough we would need to develop Uranian time zones as well. I would do this similar to the Earth’s time zones; which is add or subtract an hour every 15° E/W of the Prime Meridian, respectively. Uranus and its moons already have Equators and Prime Meridians. Someone else will name these time zones. On Uranus the GMT equivalent is Zilch Mean Time[5]. Zilch refers to being 0º E/W of Uranus’ Prime Meridian. When measuring from the Uranus’ Origin Point (0º E/W, 0º N/S) going clockwise there is 4,657.616 km between each time zone. Since Uranus has no surface colonists would be required to live in flying cities. Any lunar colonies will use this same calendar, but I will try to develop time zones for the Uranian moons. So someone else will set up the Uranian lunar time zones, but the Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Five will be used on these Uranian lunar colonies. When talking about lunar time zones, Uranus has several moons; so to establish the standard for the moons I will average the diameters. Their average diameter is 252.526 km, the time zones on the Uranian moons will have 23.009 km between each time zone; going clockwise around them when measuring from their Origin Points. This calendar is to have a seven-bisol week-cycle, so that it is liked by the religious groups. This is acceptable to religious group, making religion on Uranus easy.
The atmosphere of Uranus is composed primarily of hydrogen and helium, with a small amount of methane and traces of water and ammonia. Uranus gets its blue-green color from methane gas. Sunlight is reflected from Uranus’ cloud tops, which lie beneath a layer of methane gas. As the reflected sunlight passes back through this layer, the methane gas absorbs the red portion of the light, allowing the blue portion to pass through, resulting in the blue-green color that we see. The planet’s atmospheric details are very difficult to see in visible light. The bulk (80 per-cent or more) of the mass of Uranus is contained in an extended liquid core consisting primarily of ‘icy’ materials (water, methane, and ammonia), with higher-density material at depth.
In 1986, Voyager 2 observed faint cloud markings in the southern latitudes blowing westward between 100 and 600 km/h[6]. In 2004, the Keck Observatory in Hawaii used advanced optics to capture highly detailed images of Uranus as the planet approached its southern autumnal equinox, when the equator will be vertically illuminated by the Sun.
The seven bisols in my Uranian week are:
7 U-ld name meaning
1 Sunbisol Sunday (weekend)
2 Mondebisol Moons’ day
3 Tuesbisol Tuesday
4 Wednesbisol Wednesday
5 Thursbisol Thursday
6 Fribisol Friday
7 Saturbisol Saturday (weekend).
This calendar’s epoch is Jesus Christ’s birth. The JD count is 1,721,419. The epoch formula for Uranus is: ((y*365.2425*24)/34.4794)/21360.344; y = current Earth year, round to nearest whole number[7]. This would make the current Uranus year be +23:01 U or +23 in Alpha U. +23:01 U or +23 in Alpha U started on January 1, +2009 E and will end on August 15, +2010 E; August 16, +2010 E will start +23:02 U or +23 in Beta U. This calendar begins on January 1 in each segment[8]. The Uranus year starts with January 1 in Alpha. This is a non-perpetual calendar for Uranus; it is a Vernal Equinox Calendar. With this set up I can track the actual seasons on Uranus. The Uranus year is divided into four seasons[9]. The seasons fall: Vernal Equinox is January 28 in Alpha, Summer Solstice is September 13 in Pegasus, Autumn Equinox is September 13 in Cygnus, and Winter Solstice is September 13 in Norma; all jump back a bisol on leap Uranus years. The holibisols are as follows: April 22 in Beta is Uranus Bisol, December 10 in Beta is Exploration Bisol, and Foundation Bisol is the bisol that the first colony was established on Uranus and/or its moons[10]. Each moon will have its own Foundation Bisol which will fall according to the definition. My reasoning for basing the calendar on Uranus and not each individual moon is as follows: they are moons of Uranus with locked orbits. None of these moons rotate, in that case and only that I would base the calendar on the moon not its primary. If we had a colony on Earth’s Moon the colonists would use the Earth calendar, Gregorian, not the Chinese for day to day activities and planning. So this makes it logically to design a calendar for the Uranian moons based on Uranus not each individual moon. NASA currently does not use an independent calendar for timekeeping on Uranus and/or its moons[11]. The age equivalencies are start school at one segment and 20 months, drive at five segments and 22 months, vote at and end school at six segments and 15 months, get drunk at seven segments and 18 months, and retire at 24 segments. The length of a workbisol is 11 h 29' 35.28". This is simple.
Posted by J.S. at 7:52 PM 0 comments
Applications information:
To talk evolution, I believe that people born on this planet could evolve into: Homo uranianus. Anyways people would set up everything to this calendar. The fiscal year would become just a cycle of any 31 calendar segments. When shipping between planets though everything would converted to the JD count or Earth-time. Now to talk the academic year, this would be quite different from Earth. So as to not get confused in the table below I will equate it to Earth-time for you. Our fix year is 24:01 U, so 24:02 U starts on October 12, 2021 E, and ends on June 28, 2024 E.
Miranda is the smallest and innermost of Uranus’ five major moons. It was discovered by Gerard Kuiper on 1948-02-16 at McDonald Observatory. It was named after Miranda from William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest by Kuiper in his report of the discovery. The adjectival form of the name is Mirandan. It is also designated Uranus V. So far the only close-up images of Miranda are from the Voyager 2 probe, which made observations of the moon during its Uranus flyby in January, 1986. During the flyby the southern hemisphere of the moon was pointed towards the Sun so only that part was studied. Miranda shows more evidence of past geologic activity than any of the other Uranian satellites.
Uranus Earth-time
grades ages grades ages grades
1&20 p 5 p
2&5 k 6 k
2&14 1 7 1
2&21 2 8 2
3&8 3 9 3
3&17 4 10 4
4&1 5 11 5
4&10 6 12 6
4&19 7 13 7
5&4 8 14 8
5&13 9 15 9
5&22 10 16 10
6&7 11 17 11
6&15 12 18 12
The importance of these applications is: because you were born on a different planet. If we were to measure you age in Earth-time we would not be getting an accurate image of how old you actually are. By setting everything to the new planet, Uranus, an accurate image of age and operations is given. The operations image explains why companies would set their fiscal year to the planet time, Uranus. Without it set to planet time, Uranus, and not Earth-time you would not get an accurate image of these company/business operations. As far as holidays/holibisols go there calendar would show both. The holidays on Uranus, most of them would be celebrated 31 times a year; the holibisols would be celebrated once per year. This would allow each holiday to occur once per segment. The life span of a human is: one Uranus year 13 segments and seven months.
The planet time is secondary. The planet time is tracked independently from Earth-time, but it is not shown apart from Earth-time. Therefore color codes are used: Uranus is blue, Earth is green.
The way these calendars would be sold is near the end of each segment, because it is longer than an Earth year. The color coded remains the same for the clocks. All planet time clocks are digital, there is no “a.m./p.m.” style for Uranus. The clocks just count 34 h 28' 45.84". Computers meant for Uranus would show time the same way. One Uranus-sol is shown as on the clock this and that 17h14'23.000" and One Bisol is shown as 34h28'45.840". All Earth-time is shown in GMT. The Uranus time zones are arbitrary time zones; they are set up to the Uranian coordinate system.
If someone was born on Uranus their birth certificate would read:
“Name: Zachary Quest Bealeton ###-##-####
Place: New Jamestown, United States Uranus Oberon Colony #####
Room ### St. John’s Hospital #### Federal Street
When: June 6, +2026 E @ 2:56 p.m. or November 19, +24:03 U @ 30h41'39.076"”
The birth certificate example above only includes what would be different between a regular Earth birth certificate and a birth certificate for someone born on this planet, Uranus. Next I will show you an example of what that same person’s divers license would look like, enlarged picture not included. All names in these examples are fake.
“NEW JAMESTOWN Under 21 E-y Until Class
DRIVER LICENSE 06-06-+2047 E (F)
22-19-+24:12 U
License Number N#########
BEALETON
ZACHARY QUEST
#### GRAND ST
NEW JAMESTOWN, U.S. URANUS OBERON #####
Birth-date Expiration Date
06-06-+2026 E 06-06-+2046 E
22-19-+24:03 U 22-19-+24:11 U
Male (height) (weight) (eye color)
Restrictions Endorsements
(signature)”
Uranus
sol 17 h 14' 23"
2 sols
bisols 34 h 28' 45.84"
clock 17 h 14' 23" face
year 84.019 E-y
31 segments 1 segment = 936.427 M-d
989.913 E-d
689.047 U-ld
24 months
regular = 689 U-ld
irregular = 690 U-ld
common year 31 regular segments
leap year 30 regular segments, 1 irregular segment
placement February 29 in Alpha
formula +3 U-y; -100 U-y, +300 U-y
distance 19.191 AU
moons 27
week 7 U-ld
accuracy 4,677,789 U-y
GMT Zilch Mean Time
covers 4657.616 km each
epoch 12/25/+0000 E 1,721,419
+23:01 U start January 1, +2009 E
end August 15, +2010 E
seasons spring Pisces 20 in Alpha
summer Pisces 29 in Phoenix
fall April 30 in Fornax
winter May 29 in Lyra
ages start school at 1 segment and 20 months
drive at 5 segments and 22 months
vote at 6 segments and 15 months
drink alcohol at 7 segments and 18 months
retire at 24 segments and 0 months
work 11 h 29' 35.28"
competitors N/A
independence No

[1] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Uranus. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 329-330.
[2] Scientific Astronomer Documentation. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Wolfram Research, Inc. 4 April 2009 <http://documents.wolfram.com/applications/astronomer/AdditionalInformation/PlanetographicCoordinates.html>
[3] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[4] wilderness.org. Nelson, Gaylord. October 1993. Google, Inc. 13 April 2009 <http://earthday.wilderness.org/history/>
[5] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Uranus&Display=Overview>
[6] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[7] Dictionary.com. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Ask.com. 2 April 2009 <http://dictionary.reference.com/translate>,Alphabetical listing of constellations. Dolan, Chris. 1 January 2005. Google, Inc. 11 May 2009 <http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellation_list.html>
[8] Rowen, Beth. Space. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2006. 220.
[9] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 10 February 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Uranus&Display=Moons>
[10] Greek Alphabet. Physics and Astronomy Links - PhysLink.com. Web. 09 Sept. 2009. <http://www.physlink.com/reference/GreekAlphabet.cfm>
[11] Missions: By Target: Mars: Present. Solar System Exploration. Web. 01 Oct. 2009. <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/missions/profile.cfm?Sort=Planet&Object=Uranus&Mission=Voyager_2>

A Calendar Variant for Mercury

1. Mercury: 57,909,175 km (0.387 AU) 1 Jeremiahn Variant
Distance from the Sun
Perihelion 46,000,000 km
Aphelion 69,820,000 km
Mean distance 57,909,175 km (0.387 AU)
Year length 87.97 E-d
Orbital eccentricity 0.2056
Orbital inclination 7.00°
Solar day 175.95 E-d
Sidereal day 58.65 E-d
Rotational inclination 0.01°
Mass 330,220,000,000,000,000,000 t
Mean radius 2,439.7 km
Mean density 5.427 g/cm3
Moons 0
Average surface temperature 167.22 °C
October 21, +2009 E 12:00 PM
September 26, +2009 E 12:05 PM
February 2, +8344 R 06h17'00.226"
January 17, +8343 R 32h00'25.805"
A Calendar Variant for Mercury

I would hope we never actually put a colony on Mercury, but so that planet time could be tracked I will make this calendar[1]. Mercury is the only planet that is in a tidal locked orbit with the sun, this is because it is the closest planet to the sun and it is this closeness that gives it its seemingly tidal locked orbit. This means that one side of Mercury is normally facing the Sun where as the other side is normally away from the Sun. That means one side is in a virtually eternal “day” and the other is in a virtually eternal “night.” Mercury surprisingly does rotate three times every two of its years. But that does not mean that it would not make a good vacation spot. A Mercury year is 87.97 E-d and a Mercury-sol is 175.94 E-d. That is right the Mercury-sol is longer than the Mercury year. This would make it unwise to put a colony there. Mercury has an average surface 167°C, the “day” side can get as hot as 430°C while the “night” side gets as cold as -170°C. Because Mercury is so close to the Sun terraforming is out of the question, even if you could the new atmosphere would be vaporized before you got done. It is all these factors together that make me say we will never put colony on Mercury, but we will go for vacation there. Mercury has ice on its poles, surprising.
This calendar is for the fun of the vacationers. This is the Jeremiahn Variant Calendar Four for Mercury[2]. There is no real use to this calendar other than just having fun. Divide the Mercury-sol 100 ways; so centisols are used on the calendar. A centisol is 42.226 h (42 h 13' 32.16"). One Mercury year is 87.97 E-d or 49.9995 R-cd (49 R-cd 42 h 12' 21.6"). [3][4]That is 18 h 13' 32.16" longer than a day. This clock will count 42 h 13' 32.16" before ticking to the next centisol; to preserve our hours, minutes, and seconds. The clock does use a millisecond counter. The base unit is the “centisol.” This calendar will have two months; span 24-26 R-cd each. It has a 50 R-cd Mercury year. [5][6][7]This calendar does start with one on its year count. Mercury is 57,909,175 km (0.387 AU) from the Sun, which gives it a shorter year.
#. months spans
1. January 24
2. February 26
This calendar is just for fun. This calendar has an accuracy of 46,689 R-y, its Ls is the anti-meridian. Eventually we would need to develop Mercurial time zones as well. I would do this similar to the Earth’s time zones; which is add or subtract an hour every 15° E/W of the Prime Meridian, respectively. On Mercury the GMT equivalent is Hun Kal Mean Time. Hun Kal is a crater that lies 20º away from Mercury’s Prime Meridian[8]. When measuring from the Mercury’s Origin Point (0º E/W, 0º N/S) going clockwise there is 363.0252 km between each time zone. Mercury has no official moons, so no lunar colony for Mercury. This calendar will have a seven-centisol week-cycle. This will be acceptable to religious groups, making religion on Mercury easy[9].
Mercury is named for the Roman gods’ messenger, is the closet planet to the Sun and the smallest in the Solar System. Mercury is too much in line with the Sun to be observed against a dark sky; therefore it always seen during morning or evening twilight.
The seven centisols in my Mercurial week are:
7 R-cd name meaning
1 Suncentisol Sunday (weekend)
2 Einscentisol One day
3 Tuescentisol Tuesday
4 Dreicentisol Three day
5 Thurscentisol Thursday
6 Fricentisol Friday
7 Saturcentisol Saturday (weekend).
This calendar’s epoch is Jesus Christ’s birth. The JD count is 1,721,419. The epoch formula for Mercury is: ((y*365.2425*24)/42.226)/49.9995; y = current Earth year, round to nearest whole number. This would make the current Mercury year be +8341 R. +8341 R started on January 1, +2009 E and ended on March 29, +2009 E; March 30, +2009 E started on +8342 R. +2009 E will end as +8346 R on Mercury. This calendar begins with January 1. This is a calendar for Mercury, it is non-perpetual. Mercury does not have any seasons, therefore no need to track them. I am not going to put any holicentisols on the Mercury calendar. Because of Mercury’s closeness to the Sun a colony is undesirable, but that does not make it a bad vacation spot. NASA currently does not use an independent calendar for timekeeping on Mercury. Since there will not be a colony we do not need to worry about age equivalencies. So I will not calculate them. The length of a workcentisol is 14 h 4' 31.2". This is simple to grasp for most humans with a brain. This will be accepted by religious groups. This is simple.
Posted by J.S. at 7:56 AM 0 comments
Applications information:
There are none this calendar is just for fun!!!! Mercury’s color is pink. Our fix year is 8350 R, so 8351 R start on April 12, 2011 E, and end on July 10, 2011 E.
Mercury
sol 175.94 E-d
100 R-cd
1 R-cd 42 h 13' 32.16"
clock 21 h 6' 46.08" face
year 87.97 E-d
50 R-cd
2 months
leap year N/A
distance 0.387 AU
moons 0
week 7 R-cd
accuracy 46689 R-y
GMT Hun Kal Mean Time
covers 363.0252 km each
epoch 12/25/+0000 E 1,721,419
+2009 E start +8341 R
end +8346 R
1 R-y 3 Earth months
seasons N/A holidays: N/A
ages N/A
work 14 h 4' 31.2"
competitors N/A
independence no


[1] Joyce, Alan C. Planets of the Solar System, Mercury. World Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2008. 328.
[2] wilderness.org. Nelson, Gaylord. October 1993. Google, Inc. 13 April 2009 <http://earthday.wilderness.org/history/>
[3] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[4] Scientific Astronomer Documentation. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Wolfram Research, Inc. 4 April 2009 <http://documents.wolfram.com/applications/astronomer/AdditionalInformation/PlanetographicCoordinates.html>
[5] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 21 January 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009 <http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Mercury&Display=Kids>
[6] Dictionary.com. anonymous. 1 January 2009. Ask.com. 2 April 2009 <http://dictionary.reference.com/translate>,Alphabetical listing of constellations. Dolan, Chris. 1 January 2005. Google, Inc. 11 May 2009 <http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellation_list.html>
[7] Star constellations. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. Ed 2. New York: Random House, 1987.
[8] Rowen, Beth. Space. Time for kids Almanac. Ed 1. Vol 1. 2006. 219.
[9] Solar System Exploration. Davis, Phil. 21 January 2009. NASA. 8 April 2009<http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Mercury>

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About Me

I am a Christian!! I am also a scientist, and I find more logic in Christianity than atheism. I have only been a Christian since I was 14, when I was baptized. I pretty good at astronomy, and happen to be a big sci-fi fan. The thing I am major good at is accounting, handling other people's money. I am currently going after my CPA. And after I get that I will get an associates in astronomy. I am batmanfanforever08 on YouTube; the "audio clip" is my YouTube channel. I am on Facebook, the "my web page" is my Facebook page. These blogs will be included in the book I am writing (assuming I ever get around to finishing it): "Listening to the Nonsense" or "Tracking Planet Time for our Solar System".